MBA Resolutions and New Years Goals for 2018. Or Is It The Other Way Around?

Beef Noodle Soup from Yongkang Street in Taipei

I hadn’t been thinking about New Years Resolutions when I sat for lunch with my Uncle Tom on New Years Day. But, I had been thinking about adjusting my MBA goals as I start my final semester. Let’s call them MBA resolutions.

Uncle Tom is who I go to for insight and practical advice, because he has a lot of international business experience in pharmaceuticals, a very complex industry. What he said to me was, “Phil, I’ve opened a hundred companies and hired thousands of people.”

“The most important thing is motivation, communication, and interpersonal relationships. Especially for MBA.”

I couldn’t tell if he was consoling me because my semester wasn’t going to end well. One of my goals was presenting a strong academic record in Asia to Asians. My semester was mostly a case of dmned if you do, fcked if you don’t. Some opportunities also fell through.

Fall 2017 Didn’t Go As Planned

I was admitted to Kyoto University’s dual-degree program, and then I wasn’t. The plan. Learn Japanese, take advanced electives, get my American CPA — Japan is the only place I can test for it in Asia. To be fair, my paperwork was late, but I had very short notice and was told it’d be okay. A lot of other people also want this opportunity, and I hope whoever goes has a great time!

Elsewhere, I ran out of resources, didn’t have time to process what was going on, and pushed through. I pushed myself and felt pushed to meet standards  beyond what we should do, and I knew it. Good things, and some firsts started, though. We learned what we’d need to do to make positive change happen.

Why is all this so challenging?

  • Busy people don’t have time to process, of course. But, they generally have jobs, which means money to make their lives run smoother.
  • Students have neither time or money. They have classwork.
  • Student council presidents aren’t really considered students. The stakeholder management is challenging.
    • If the school wants you to do something, you’re expected to. When you aren’t able to, some understand. Some say you’re uncooperative. The difference between can’t and won’t isn’t always understood. Maybe this is partly why I couldn’t go to Kyoto. Such is life! Balancing the breaks is part of the job.
    • When students need (or expect) you to do something and no one else is around to help, that’s just your duty.

Stress is a mental and physical condition. But the business world doesn’t like excuses. Fortunately, I’m back to being a student soon. Will being student council president help me get hired? In Uncle Tom’s words,

“Bring it up at the right time right place.”

MBA Resolutions: Motivation, Communication, Relationships

Taking the rest of Uncle Tom’s suggestions to heart, I came up with a few “MBA Resolutions” for 2018.

How MBAs Get Hired. Personal MBA Resolutions by Philip Chang.

I’m a MBA student. Of course I draw diagrams.

MBA Resolutions: Motivation

The Motivation to go deeper into the subjects I need to learn to be more competitive. MBA programs go broad. But to be useful, we need to be good at something so that we’re good for something. As far as MBA Resolutions go, this is a really good one for everybody.

Personally? I will strengthen my quantitative business science (QBS) skills, and continue studying Chinese. Our new QBS professor says, “I believe that if you have heart, you can learn most of it in a month.” We’re going to find out how much heart I have in 2018. And really, if you can reach native levels of 中文(Chinese), everything else is easy in comparison.

MBA Resolutions: Communication

Adjusting my English so people understand more than 80% of the words coming out of my mouth. People love American pop culture, and American English is taught here. But, during higher education, most people in Taiwan and Asia (Singapore, Hong Kong) end up with a form of Commonwealth English that’s spoken and interpreted differently. It creates a language soup that’s not clearly defined — outside of basic greetings and simple conversation.

This is a cultural tick people don’t pick up on until they move here. The phenomenon also isn’t well-represented on maps.

Global Map of Where Commonwealth and American English is Taught

An unscientific look at where Commonwealth and American English is taught. Blue is for British. Americans, we’re outnumbered. (Credit: MoverDB)

Some things I try to promote around this MBA program is empathy, understanding, and forgiveness. In part because of the translation involved when people speak with 1) different accents (native vs. foreign Chinese), or 2) different meanings (Commonwealth vs. American English).

People either just want to be heard, want the straightforward solution that’s hard to come by in a bureaucracy, or don’t want to change (like most adults). Understanding which of the three options are in play, is recognizing the culture and mental model — this might be more important than listening skills.

My senior is very careful not to weaponize his English with his Taiwanese girlfriend. Another tells me it’s a lot about code-switching. I agree. One person’s meaning vs. another’s understanding of that word or phrase.

Weaponizing a language means using words, on purpose, that non-native speakers won’t understand.”

Can’t vs. won’t, for example. What a difference a few words make!

MBA Resolutions: Interpersonal Relationships

Investing in getting to know the people who intrigue me. Now that I have fewer responsibilities flying around. Things minor or urgent emerging here and there. Wicked problems to contend with. I’ve actually met a lot of people. I just haven’t given myself the time to sit down and have a beer with them.

Alibaba founder Jack Ma speaking at a conference

I really just want to have a chance to meet this guy. (Courtesy: WSJ)

Also, my MBA program is going on its first study trip, to China, in April. We’re visiting Alibaba Group, Geely Automotive — which owns Volvo, and Zhejiang University’s Innovation Institute.

But the best part of this is going to be spending time with this crew in Hangzhou (locals, you’ve been warned).


“We’re going to find out how much heart I have in 2018.”


These people connect my MBA resolutions together and make this experience valuable! But now that I’m concluding my term as student council president, I’m looking forward to having more flexibility to fulfill my own goals in just one semester with what I value most — time.

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